Tag Archives: projector

Interactive Video-mapped using Projectors

Have you ever seen floors, walls, or objects with abstract light and shadow effects, that look like they are coming to life? If so, you probably saw a version of video mapping or projection mapping. Lighting a 3D object or an irregular shape with a digital display is called video mapping or projection mapping. Video/projection mapping had been popular with DJ artists using lights from projectors to enhance the audio with synced visuals. Recently, projection mapping has been used on a large scale projection such as Cinderella Castle in Disney Parks, which is used to project special 3D events and shows. Large scale projection mapping like this uses large projectors with 20,000 lumens output or greater. Video mapping has also become more mainstream with the accessibility to many different types of projectors as well as specialized software to help design and map the projection. 

Video and projection mapping is not easy work as it requires a lot of planning as well as learning 3D modelling. If you are thinking of creating your own interactive video mapping project, here are some simplified steps that might help you understand the process. A more detailed instruction can be found at Make an Affordable Interactive Videomapped Installation. The first step is to determine what image or video to project as well as the object or surface that you want to project on. After that, you would need to find out what projector you want to use based on your where, how, and what you are planning on doing for the mapping. You want to install the projector at a fixed location. Next, you are going to need to design your image to fit with the surface that you are working on. On irregular surfaces, you will need video mapping software such as MadMapperHeavyMQlabTroixatronix’s IsadoraFaçadeSignageArKaos, or Photopshop to help you edit your design. If you are able to get your design, the next step is to use your projector to display your designs. For more examples for creative ideas, you can check out: Top 20 Best Projection Mapping Examples. For smaller scale video mapping on everyday objects, check out this Projection Mapping website.

This Fake Window trend is going viral on TikTok-Here’s how to do it with a projector!

I’m sure if you’re an avid TikTok user, you already know about the many trends that arise from the app. One of the latest trends that are going viral on the app is the “Fake Window” Challenge. How it works is very simple and anyone can do it, so long as you have the right tools (hint: projector?)

What is the “Fake Window” Challenge?

The “Fake Window” challenge is exactly as the name states, a fake window. This is done by using a projector in your room to project a video of a fake window. This gives off the appearance that the view from your bedroom could literally be anything! During times like this when it’s normal to stay home, being able to have a change of scenery in the comfort of your bedroom is great.

There are two things you will need for this challenge to work:

  1. A fake window video/gif(can be found on the internet)
  2. A projector (doesn’t need to be something fancy)

Finding the best “Fake Window”

Do a quick google search and you’ll be able to find a lot of different fake window images. Most people usually use videos to give off that super-realistic feeling where they can not only see but hear as well! These videos can easily be found on YouTube, here’s a link to one:

The Best Projector for YOU

There isn’t necessarily a perfect projector for this challenge to work. Obviously, some projectors are overall better than those that aren’t nearly as good, but people shouldn’t be limited to expensive choices. An example of a good projector at an average price would be the AAXA BP1 Bluetooth Speaker Projector ($155 USD).

Buy: AAXA BP1 Bluetooth Speaker Projector

AAXA is well known for its PICO (portable and mini) projectors, making their projectors a perfect example of this type of challenge. We wouldn’t want to have a super big projector bringing in heat when doing this challenge (especially since summer is just around the corner), we want to be able to show you something that affordable and convenient! The BP1 Bluetooth Speaker Projector as the name states is a mini projector and a speaker at the same time. This portable projector will get you the best of both worlds in terms of picture quality and ambient sounds to soothe you while you lay near your fake window.

Buy: AAXA P300 Neo 420 Lumen Pico Projector

Another contender that would be great for this challenge is another projector from AAXA, the P300 Neo 420 Lumen Pico Projector($294 USD). With its sleek design, lightweight, and native 720p resolution, you best believe you’ll have an amazing experience with this mini projector, not just with the “Fake Window” challenge but with many different uses as well! This mini projector is great for the challenge especially if you’re looking to have it running without being plugged in. Wait, did I forget to mention that it has a rechargeable battery? Well, that’s a bonus in itself, you won’t be limited to a fixed location and you can place it anywhere you want since its keystone function will allow you to adjust the vertical angle from where you place the projector.

So what are you waiting for? Go get a projector and download the best “fake window” image or video you can find, and let us know your results!

Ultra-Compact RGB Pico Projector For Smart Glasses

ColorChip Miniature RGB Projector (PRNewsfoto/ColorChip Ltd.)

A photonic integrated technology company known as ColorChip recently released an innovative, compact, lens system for AR/VR smart glasses that utilizes Pico Projector technology. This new lens platform is in anticipation for the potential upswing in the AR/VR market, particularly if Apple releases their version of SmartGlasses at the end of the year.

Tethered and standalone SmartGlasses with ColorChip Miniature RGB Projector (PRNewsfoto/ColorChip Ltd.)

This RGB Pico-Projector gives the smart glasses lens a highly efficient display with low power consumption. Because of the way ColorChip embedded the RGB beam combiner ( an arrangement of splitters and mirrors to disperse and combine light) in the glass, the need for expensive and complex housing for the projector is no longer necessary. You can see how the projection unit fits snuggle on the arm of the glasses.

The fact that a pico projector based system has gotten this advanced is remarkable. This Smart Lens platform made by ColorChip is crucial in the advancement of projection technology. The ability to make a compact unit that has low power consumption and is able to have an efficient display will hopefully influence big companies in the micro and pico projectors market to make smaller more compact projectors.

AAXA P7 HD Projector Review: A Small Package With A Big Punch!

© Photo by AAXA

The AAXA P7 Mini HD Projector fits snuggly in your had and is one of the smallest 1080p projectors that we have seen. The P7 does a wonderful job at displaying small complex designs and can function as a media player for your videos, photos, and music. It is remarkable how portable this projector is. A downside is that compared to some of AAXA’s other pico projectors, the P7 is not as bright which makes some video quality only okay.

© Photo by AAXA

The AAXA P7’s body is a sleek black and gray, and measures 2.7 x 4.7 x 4.4 inches and weighs an incredible 1.4lbs. Like AAXA’s other projectors the P7 is a DLP projector that uses LEDs as its light source. The LED’s lamp life is rated at 30,0000 hours which is impressive for an LED. The AAXA P7 has a 600-lumen output when it is plugged into its AC adapter and 450 lumens when it is going portable. According to AAXA, the battery should last 90 minutes on a charge.

Unlike others on the market, the AAXA P7 is a true 1080p projector. There are many 1080p projectors on the market but many don’t have a true 1,920 by 1,080 pixel (1080p) resolution. This little projector does and proves it. The biggest and best advantage is really the portability of this projector. The size lets you take it into any meeting, small church, school presentation, or even a movie night without much hassle or setup. It really is plug and play.

© Photo by AAXA

On the front of the P7, the lens is positioned in the upper left-hand corner. On the back of the body, you will find an HDMI port, an Infrared Receiver for the remote, and a USB Type-A port to put your media via flash drive. The projector’s right side comes with the power adapter plug, a VGA adapter port, and a slot for a Micro-SD card. On top is a small panel cluster that acts as a manual control.

When testing the image quality of the P7 mini projector I noticed a slight degrade in image quality with the introducing another light source, in this case, the screen size had to be shrunk to get the image back to normal. I tested both data- and video-image quality over an HDMI connection. Looking at the text quality on score there were no issues with both black and white. The colors themself are rich and realistic looking.

Even though the P7 shined a little less bright than other pico projectors, and there were hiccups in the image quality, this is a great buy for only $399. The portability and its true native resolution make it a true steal. It would be great for the traveling businessman and does a pretty good job of showing movies and playing music.

Philips Pico Projector Review

© Photo by IndieGoGo

When getting ready for a business meeting or trying to have a theatre night with your family, the projector that you use can make or break the event. The issue in the past with projectors was not only the brightness, but the sheer size of a projector was large enough to take up the back seat in most vehicles. The answer to this was to make a compact projector also known as a pico or mini projector. Some notable pico projector companies on the market currently are AAXA, Sony, Optoma, Epson, Vava and the main subject of today’s topic, Philips.

The Philips PicoPix Max is a 1080p supported Full HD pico projector that features Android Os, an invisible top touchpad Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth and USB-C connectivity to mirror your apps. I must admit I think that it is really cool that micro projector companies are starting to make the move to incorporating USB-C. Out of the box, the Pico Projector comes with a travel pouch, a power adapter, a remote control, stand, and the projector itself. In terms of the design and features of this mini projector, I have them listed below.

© Nerdy Tech


Specifications
Display technology: DLP
LED light sources: last over 30.000 hours
Brightness: up to 850 Color Lumens
Resolution: 1920 x 1080 pixel
Resolution supported: up to 4K
Aspect ratio: 16:9
Throw ratio: 1,2:1
Contrast ratio: 10,000:1
Focus adjustment: auto
Keystone correction: auto
4 corners correction: yes
Screen size (diagonal): 76cm-305cm / 30?-120?
Screen distance: 78cm-320cm / 31?-126?
Integrated media player: yes
Internal memory: 16 GB
Built-in touchpad: yes
Operating system: Android
Wi-Fi: 802.11a/b/g/n/ac 2,4+5GHz: Airplay, Miracast
Bluetooth: 5.0; connect external speaker
USB: USB Type-C: 2x power and video
HDMI: x 1
Micro SD: x 1
Sound: Internal speaker 2 x 4W

In terms of the overall user experience, this pico projector‘s software, possibly due to its application design, and maybe the processing hardware, feels quite slow. For example, when adding the device to your wifi, the selection of access points keeps changing despite your wishes. When viewing the picture, the 1080p HD works smoothly, but the video in 4k lags at points. In comparison to the BenQ 4k projector, and AAXA’s 4k1 projector the latency issues caused some headaches. The positives of this are that the 1080p is crisp, it is very user-friendly, and the portability of this product is really top-notch. If you are trying to find an extremely affordable option for a solidly built projector, the PicoPix Max isn’t that bad of an option for only $549. However, if you want a projector whose picture resolution lives up to its description, it is ok to spend the extra on brands like BenQ, AAXA, Optoma, and Sony.

Is LED Projection Taking Over The Projector Market?

© Photo by Fat Llama

The constant evolution of projectors has caused a race to focus on image quality and brightness to deliver the clearest image. The projector market and even the pico projector market have projectors that have resolution support up to 4k. When it comes to whether to pick a laser projector or a LED projector the question becomes a bit skewed for the untrained consumer.

At the current time, laser projectors are bright than the LED projectors currently on the market. However, this brightness comes at a cost of two factors that may change your perspective on the laser projector. Laser projectors are more expensive and heavier than LED projectors. For a cheaper price, LEDs are able to bring a picture quality closer to that of a laser projector. AAXA’s 4k1 supports up to 4k resolution and is a small compact LED projector for under $800 while the VAVA 4k Laser projector is listed currently at $2,799. So when it comes to needing a portable mini projector that gives picture quality for a solid price it is safe to go for the more inexpensive model. That is because most LED projectors and micro projectors have an operating life of over 20,000 hours! So even though the laser projectors are the kings of the projector market, the LED projectors are close on their tail. So the question isn’t if advancements in LEDs catch up to the laser projector market but when.

AV Professionals In 2020 Are Still Choosing Standard and Pico Projectors Over Flat Displays

© Photo by My Projector Lamps

In 2020, a time when cars have become electric and the bulky projectors you remember from grade school have been turned into micro projectors big enough to fit in your pocket. The AV industry is still choosing LED projectors over flat panels. You may ask yourself why is this? Shouldn’t flat panel displays be just as technologically advanced as the newest projectors? One answer to this question is simply the statement that sometimes size does matter.

While the graphics on flat-panel screens are impressive, that does not matter when you factor in size screen. When it comes to applications that require text and numbers to be displayed on-screen, screen size is the most important factor. Yes, I understand that there are currently TVs that support 8k picture quality. But something to take into consideration is that a good chunk of LED projectors and even pico projectors the size of your hand supports a picture resolution up to 4k. Companies like Acer, AAXA, Optoma, and others have created a product line of mini projectors that can not only cover a wall with an image or video enough to comfortably give a classroom of students optimal viewing but have also achieved a high lumen output in such a compact electronic.

Another factor that these projects particularly micro projectors have over traditional flat panel displays are there portable design. We all remember the days in school when the class would get a substitute and the poor guy or gal would have to roll in a zenith on a cart with broken wheels to play an episode of Bill Nye the Science Guy. With pico projectors, AV professionals and teachers alike are able to carry a projector that can display a 200″ picture for there students that is the size of there hand. The AV professionals have it right with using LED and Laser projectors for a bigger screen. One day both standard and micro projectors will catch up to the picture quality of TV and maybe then the rest of the world will follow the advice of the AV professional.

Chinavasion “MiniView” LED Projector…

If you’re budget sensitive and really want a mobile pico projector, the latest Miniview LED projector from Chinavasion may be a fit. The main features that it boasts is having a variety of input connections and its mobility.

budget video projectorThe MiniView does not have batteries and does requires a power cord to plugged in to work. Shinning with a 55 ASNI Lumens this project has a price tag of $69.91.

“With an 100 inch wide projection, 200: 1 contrast and 1.67 million color projection the Miniview is a high performing video projector,” says Rose Li, PR manager for the projector specialist.

While this may not be the brightest in the bunch it has been doing surprisingly well in the market. One of its key features to talk about is the coaxial input allowing the user to connect their cable or satellite feeds directly into the projector.

Here is the list of inputs:

1 x Antenna
1 x Micro SD Card Slot
1 x USB
1 x HDMI
1 x VGA D-Sub 15pin
1 x Composite
1 x EF

So the question you have to ask yourself is if the MiniView’s functionality and low price outweigh a competitor’s brighter display, higher price, and in some cases better mobility (battery powered)?

Carnegie Mellon Researchers Reduce Headlight Glare through Projectors

 

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University say they’re working on a solution that could make raindrops nearly invisible while lighting the road in front of you.

The problem Carnegie researchers are trying to solve is that headlight beams are reflected back at the driver when it rains, snows, sleets, et cetera. The brighter your headlights, the brighter the light is reflected back at you, and the harder it is to see the road ahead of you.

Carnegie’s researchers came up with a possible solution involves a camera, a digital light processing (DLP) projector, and a reflecting mirror, alongwith a computer to control the whole setup. As rain falls, the camera can detect individual raindrops and predict their velocity and trajectory. It sends that information to the projector, which projects a small black dot over each rain drop’s location. The result, researchers hope, is the ability to light in front of the car but not the raindrops, which would result in the most light output without returned glare.

As expected, it’s very difficult to detect individual raindrops and light around them. The system takes about 13 milliseconds to find raindrops and respond accordingly, so the top portion of the light beam would still hit the raindrops like a standard headlight. As it stands today, the system also works best at a speed of about 19 mph, where it’s 68.9 percent accurate at blacking out raindrops while still keeping over 95 percent light throughput. Drive faster and the system steadily loses accuracy. As you can see, it still is a ways off from mainstream implementation.

As we always say with futuristic tech like this, it’s going to be many years until we see something commercially viable that works like this. The system will need some big strides in digital light processing projector technology to work better,

Still, the idea of going from halogen bulbs to xenon to LED to DLP projector headlights is intriguing, and having two DLP projectors and two wide-angle cameras mounted to the front of your car would open up a whole new world of active headlights that could shift to avoid blinding oncoming traffic or pedestrians.

Who knows, maybe eventually we can project movies from those headlights.

 

 

AAXA releases M1 Ultimate-X LED Projector

AAXA Technologies has released the M1 Ultimate-X led projector. The only difference between the Ultimate and Ultimate-X is that the Ultimate-X features a 2GB SD Card instead of 1GB onboard memory. The reason AAXA has choosen to go this route is to further increase the stability of the onboard operating system.

For those unfamiliar with the M1 Ultimate here are some specs:

* Native SVGA (800×600) resolution
* Ultra-bright 75 lumen LED light source
* SD card reader – 2GB card included
* NEW aluminum case, touchpad, and tripod
* Excellent text clarity and contrast
* Input support: See technical info below
* RMVB, MP3, AVI, JPG decoder
* Projects up to a 100″ image*
*(In low-light conditions)
* Optional iPod, PSP, PDA, DVD input cables

Also, up till May 31st, use coupon code MEMD2011TB to receive free shipping+free cable of choice.