Use Mini Projectors To Enhance Your Portraits

Portrait Photo of Model using a Projector
© Photo by PhotographywithMissWilson

Hoping on a trend that our writers have been seeing resurface on TikTok is of the use of projectors to enhance and stylize creative portraits. The use of a projector in the photography studio creates a more immersive background that gives a more realistic effect when compared to effects in post-production. The great thing about this effect is the amount of freedom you can have when using the projector. 

Photoshoot with a Model using projected image as a background.
© Photo by Nick Fancher

Playing around with the different backdrops, and adjusting the brightness and focus of the projector can completely enhance the mood of each portrait. A great technique that has been highly discussed in photography forums is using projectors with a high lumen output for great background photography. Using a high lumen projector for background work and adjusting the focus of the image, brings the model into focus while naturally blurring the background.

One of the biggest hurdles that I have seen when using a projector for photography work is the mobility. The clunky projectors that you remember from your days in the meeting room and in school don’t allow for much room to move as they primarily rest on a flat mount or surface. There is a remedy for this issue however.

Instead of dealing with the weight and immobility of the standard projector, photographers pro and amateur alike should look at the market of micro and pico projectors. Not only are pico projectors more affordable but they also give you more bang for your buck. Projectors like AAXA’s P7 and the Anker Nebula Capsule give the photographer the ability to try different angles because of their compact size. The brightness of these pico projectors also really give great backdrops on effects on your subjects as the Anker boasts a solid 200 lumens and the P7 has a whopping 600 lumens.

If you are a photographer that doesn’t have a dedicated studio and wants to try this projector effect on the go, we highly reccommend Apeman’s NM4 or AAXA’s P-2B. The Apeman has a lower lumen output of 50-100 than the P2-B’s 130 lumen output, but does have a longer battery than the P-2B by about half an hour. With both of these projectors being under $200 dollars and the size of a smart phone it makes for the perfect choice for the photographer always on the go or in the field.

Go ahead and give this photography technique a try and comment below your results. A word of warning, be sure to tell your subject not to look directly into the projector. Projectors are getting brighter these days and we want you to avoid any photography disasters! If you are looking for more inspiration on these types of photos check out this behind the scenes video of projector photography!

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